Fwd: new iTunes DRM-free downloads tagged with username and ISP#



Scott Keller shkeller55 at yahoo.com
Sun Jun 10 15:48:39 CDT 2007


FYI, info I saw published on a Beatles-related mailing list.

Scott

-------------------------------------

> To: The_Beatles_Lounge at yahoogroups.com
> From: 
> Date: Sun, 10 Jun 2007 10:10:09 -0000
> Subject: [The_Beatles_Lounge] "DRMfree downloads tagged with username
> and ISP#." [whatever that means]
> 
> --- @ The_Beatles_Lounge wrote:
> I've listened to the 30-second sound bites on iTunes and I'm thinking
> about buying the album.  But I noticed that in contrast to the other
> McCartney albums on iTunes, you can't get the new one in the new
> iTunes Plus format, which is supposed to have improved sound quality.
>  I figure the problem is that iTunes Plus albums have no DRM (copy
> protection) and they're worried about illegal copyiing.
> -----------------------------------------------------------
> 
> I'm sure no one here wants to do any, y'know, crime stuff, so no one
> needs to worry about this.
> But I get a few computer geek technology newsletters, (I'm not one
> but
> it can't hurt to learn a little.)
> 
> Apparently Apple Inc's new DRM-free format is freaking some people
> out. 
> Yes, it's free of copyguard if you want to burn it to disc for
> yourself... or your friends. 
> However, each download has a tiny bit of extra information attached;
> the name, e-mail address and ISP # of the person who bought it. 
> And this gem of information stays with it no matter who you give it
> to
> and no matter who they give it to and so on. And if you - or anyone
> down the line - were to say oh I don't know upload it to an online
> newsgroup or usegroup for purposes of peer-to-peer file-sharing, that
> track could still be traced all the way back to the original
> purchaser. Who then might be open to prosecution, fines or jail time
> or be coerced into narcing on everyone he passed the song on to. 
> 
> In other words, you buy it, it's yours to do anything you want to...
> but unlike buying a CD and then giving it to a friend, this purchase
> remains your responsibility for all time (or until deleted). 
> 
> Buy an album or a track, it's yours forever. Keep it or destroy it,
> but it's like a bizarro world STD - give it to someone you trust and
> you have to assume you can trust everyone they trust, and everyone
> that person trusts, and so on down the line... forever! That hardly
> seems like something worth paying an extra thirty cents for, does it?
> 
> 
> Protests are underway, complaints are being made and Apple Inc. is
> aware of them and may rethink their whole policy of branding each
> track with the buyers personal information. but that's how it standa
> at the moment. I thought I should pass that along.
> 



Scott H. Keller
shkeller55 at yahoo.com



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